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Rambling roses that bloom on old wood, should be pruned in the fall.

Fall Rose Care

With the approach of fall weather, it’s time to think about making sure your roses are set for the remainder of the year and right into early spring.  Some rose cultivars may still be blooming, some may need some maintenance pruning ahead of winter, and you can also plant or move roses this time of year.  Here are some tips…

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LA Dreamin', an H. macrophylla cultivar bears white, blue, purple, and pink flowers simultaneously.

Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About Hydrangeas But Were Afraid to Ask

It can be very confusing sorting out what kind of hydrangea you have, especially if you don’t have access to the nursery information tag that was once attached to it.  Some hydrangeas are identifiable by their leaves, such as oak leaf hydrangeas (Hydrangea quercifolia).  It can get a little trickier with some of the other members of the family, however. …

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Coleus and Impatiens.

May Gardening Guide

Well, the weather went from pleasantly cool to uncomfortably warm in no time at all this past week.  My peaches are growing well, the nectarines not so well. The apples are all on the branches I didn’t prune during the winter, so I’ll be needing a pole harvester.  All the pears decided enough was enough and removed themselves from the…

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Rain barrels are simply any container that will hold water and can be situated within reach of a downspout diverter.

Rainwater Harvesting At a Glance

This started out as a blog on installing a rain barrel, but as I looked at information from various sources, it became clear that there’s no way I could do justice to the topic of rain barrels, let alone rainwater harvesting, in a single blog, and there are so many good resources online covering every type of water harvesting and…

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You know you want chickens.

April Gardening Guide

This is a great time to plant perennials, shrubs, and many trees, but be aware that as the weather warms up, you’ll need to keep an eye out for stress, especially related to dehydration or sun scorching.  Be sure to plant any new additions to your garden or landscape in a situation that will minimize unnecessary stress and be willing…

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Deadhead camellias as soon as the blossoms fade to discourage blight and other potential diseases.

March Gardening Guide

Spring arrives on Tuesday.  I’m finally “done” pruning my 19 fruit and nut trees, but that doesn’t stop me from barging out into the garden, loppers in hand, to remove some poor unsuspecting weak branch that I missed the first three or four times around.  I tend to err on the side of caution, so it usually takes three or…

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Forsythia Branches and Daffodils in Vase

February Gardening Guide – What to Prune and Other Februaryish Stuff

If you haven’t already gone through all the seed catalogs that appeared in the mailbox starting around Thanksgiving, or browsed for seeds on the internet, well what are you waiting for?  It’s time to plan which vegetables, herbs, perennials and annuals you’re going to start from seed, and sort out the how’s and when’s of when you’re going to get…

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Snowball Viburnum has been grown in gardens for over 500 years.

There’s Still Time to Plant Some Beauty in Your Life

When we plant shrubs and trees in the spring, we do so because the roots should have plenty of time to settle in and there’s no danger of freezing temperatures killing the roots, which in turn would kill the young shrub or tree.  But as spring advances, new leaves emerge, which require food and water to survive.  So the stress…

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Fall Leaves

October Gardening Guide

Many local nurseries (especially Randy’s Perennials and Water Gardens) will be offering some great deals this month, so October is a good time to be planting perennials, trees, and shrubs.  In much of our area, it’s safe to plant trees and shrubs if the ground isn’t frozen, as long as you’re willing to provide adequate warmth for the roots to…

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Threats of rain seem to be all early September can muster.

September Gardening Guide

We’ve had a warm, moist summer – maybe even more than a bit too moist for the liking of so many plants and trees in our gardens and landscapes.  The long hot dry spell we usually expect during mid-summer just didn’t happen this year, and it at least where I live, there have been numerous threats of rain lately, but…

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